Event Title

Immunotherapy as a Treatment for Cervical Cancer

Faculty Mentor

Kristen Abernathy, Ph.D., and Zachary Abernathy, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Mathematics

Location

West 221

Start Date

20-4-2018 1:45 PM

Description

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the known root cause for the vast majority of cervical cancers. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, and it has become the number one cancer in some developing countries. Immunotherapy is a treatment used to stimulate or restore the ability of the immune system to fight infection and disease. Implementing immunotherapy to slow or eliminate the growth of cervical cancer cells is less harmful to the patient than other treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy. Our model seeks to better understand the dynamics among HPV, cervical cancer, and immunotherapy. Furthermore, through global stability techniques, we provide sufficient conditions on immunotherapy treatment to ensure the eradication of HPV and cervical cancer cells, while allowing a positive population of healthy and immune cells to remain.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Regional Mathematics and Statistics Conference, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, November 2017; Mathematical Association of America, Southeastern Section Meeting, Clemson University, March 2018

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 1:45 PM

Immunotherapy as a Treatment for Cervical Cancer

West 221

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the known root cause for the vast majority of cervical cancers. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, and it has become the number one cancer in some developing countries. Immunotherapy is a treatment used to stimulate or restore the ability of the immune system to fight infection and disease. Implementing immunotherapy to slow or eliminate the growth of cervical cancer cells is less harmful to the patient than other treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy. Our model seeks to better understand the dynamics among HPV, cervical cancer, and immunotherapy. Furthermore, through global stability techniques, we provide sufficient conditions on immunotherapy treatment to ensure the eradication of HPV and cervical cancer cells, while allowing a positive population of healthy and immune cells to remain.