Event Title

Hispanic Immigrant Mothers and Their Children's Education

Faculty Mentor

Stephen Smith, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Political Science

Location

DIGS 222

Start Date

20-4-2018 1:15 PM

Description

This project centers around the immigrant experience in education. Initially, my question focused on students’ immigration status and whether or not it affected their academic achievement. I wanted to place the Hispanic immigrant mother at the center of this question because previous studies about the experience of undocumented youth centered the students. Using qualitative interviews with twelve Hispanic immigrant mothers, six in Rock Hill School District and six in Greenville county, I asked them about their involvement with their children’s education and their opinions on how documentation status affects the educational experiences of their children. My hypothesis was that this demographic of mothers would be involved in a limited way in their children’s education and that immigration status would negatively affect the educational achievement of undocumented students who are discouraged by the legal barriers to higher education. My findings show that documentation status does not necessarily discourage undocumented students from academic achievement, and that the limited participation of their mothers stems from systemic barriers in place before their existence, similar to the fourth face of power which examines the power or lack thereof stemming from the creation of the subjects.

Course Assignment

PLSC 502 – Smith

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Apr 20th, 1:15 PM

Hispanic Immigrant Mothers and Their Children's Education

DIGS 222

This project centers around the immigrant experience in education. Initially, my question focused on students’ immigration status and whether or not it affected their academic achievement. I wanted to place the Hispanic immigrant mother at the center of this question because previous studies about the experience of undocumented youth centered the students. Using qualitative interviews with twelve Hispanic immigrant mothers, six in Rock Hill School District and six in Greenville county, I asked them about their involvement with their children’s education and their opinions on how documentation status affects the educational experiences of their children. My hypothesis was that this demographic of mothers would be involved in a limited way in their children’s education and that immigration status would negatively affect the educational achievement of undocumented students who are discouraged by the legal barriers to higher education. My findings show that documentation status does not necessarily discourage undocumented students from academic achievement, and that the limited participation of their mothers stems from systemic barriers in place before their existence, similar to the fourth face of power which examines the power or lack thereof stemming from the creation of the subjects.