Event Title

Generational Differences in Perceptions of Interracial, Interpolitical, and Interreligious Relationships

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Honors Thesis Committee

Merry Sleigh, Ph.D.; Darren Ritzer, Ph.D.; and Donna Nelson, Ph.D.

Location

DIGS 221

Start Date

20-4-2018 1:30 PM

Description

Previous research in this series suggested that young adults feel positively toward interracial, interreligious, and inter-political relationships. They were especially supportive of interracial relationships and most concerned about interreligious pairings. When asked how their parents would feel, these young adults believed that their parents would agree with their stance on religious similarities, but would be less accepting of interracial relationships than their generation. In order to investigate this idea, I am examining young, middle, and older adults' perceptions of interracial, interreligious, and interpolitical relationships. Participants are currently being recruited through an online format. Each participant will respond to a scale that assesses attitudes toward interracial romantic relationships. Participants will then respond to the same scale; however, “interracial” will be replaced with “interreligious.” Interreligious is defined as two people of different religious belief systems. Participants will encounter the same questions, but this time they will refer to an “interpolitical” relationship, defined as two people with different political belief systems. Participants will also rank how important race, politics, and religion are when choosing a romantic partner. My goal is to compare different age groups' views on this topic in order to find out if there are major generational differences in acceptance levels.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 1:30 PM

Generational Differences in Perceptions of Interracial, Interpolitical, and Interreligious Relationships

DIGS 221

Previous research in this series suggested that young adults feel positively toward interracial, interreligious, and inter-political relationships. They were especially supportive of interracial relationships and most concerned about interreligious pairings. When asked how their parents would feel, these young adults believed that their parents would agree with their stance on religious similarities, but would be less accepting of interracial relationships than their generation. In order to investigate this idea, I am examining young, middle, and older adults' perceptions of interracial, interreligious, and interpolitical relationships. Participants are currently being recruited through an online format. Each participant will respond to a scale that assesses attitudes toward interracial romantic relationships. Participants will then respond to the same scale; however, “interracial” will be replaced with “interreligious.” Interreligious is defined as two people of different religious belief systems. Participants will encounter the same questions, but this time they will refer to an “interpolitical” relationship, defined as two people with different political belief systems. Participants will also rank how important race, politics, and religion are when choosing a romantic partner. My goal is to compare different age groups' views on this topic in order to find out if there are major generational differences in acceptance levels.