Event Title

Impacts of Drought and Flooding on California Lake Water Levels Using Remote Sensing

Poster Number

18

Faculty Mentor

Bryan McFadden, M.S.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Interdisciplinary Studies

Location

Rutledge

Start Date

21-4-2017 12:00 PM

Description

California has been experiencing dryer-than-normal conditions for the past fifteen years. In 2014, the driest year in recorded state history, the governor declared a drought state of emergency. In the past four months (mostly in a period of two weeks), rainfall in California has increased exponentially and has more than surpassed the water lost in the drought. This water fluctuation has impacted California lakes, creeks, and reservoirs as well as snowpack conditions in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The purpose of this study is to utilize satellite imagery collected between 2010 and 2017 from Landsat 5 and Landsat 8 and use the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) to quantify changes in water levels and its impact on vegetation around Lake Oroville and north-central California.

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Apr 21st, 12:00 PM

Impacts of Drought and Flooding on California Lake Water Levels Using Remote Sensing

Rutledge

California has been experiencing dryer-than-normal conditions for the past fifteen years. In 2014, the driest year in recorded state history, the governor declared a drought state of emergency. In the past four months (mostly in a period of two weeks), rainfall in California has increased exponentially and has more than surpassed the water lost in the drought. This water fluctuation has impacted California lakes, creeks, and reservoirs as well as snowpack conditions in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The purpose of this study is to utilize satellite imagery collected between 2010 and 2017 from Landsat 5 and Landsat 8 and use the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) to quantify changes in water levels and its impact on vegetation around Lake Oroville and north-central California.