Event Title

Mapping of a Female Meiotic Mutant, mei-S282, in Drosophila melanogaster

Poster Number

56

Faculty Mentor

Kathryn Kohl, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Biology

Location

Richardson Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2017 2:15 PM

Description

Meiosis is a specialized form of cell division responsible for the formation of haploid gametes utilized in sexual reproduction. During this process, meiotic recombination is essential to increase genetic diversity and ensure proper chromosome segregation. Mutations disrupting meiotic recombination can result in nondisjunction (NDJ), the failure of chromosomes to separate. Many such mutations have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster, including mei-S282. mei-S282 is a female meiotic mutant isolated in Italy in 1972, which is characterized by elevated NDJ at the first meiotic division and decreased recombination levels. While the overall goal of this research is to map mei-S282 to a precise locus, the purpose of this particular study is to determine whether the mei-S282 mutation is still present within the Drosophila stock received. Since the mutation’s approximate location has been previously mapped to position 5 on the third chromosome (3L), a deficiency of this region was crossed with our mei-S282 stock to generate homozygous female mutants at this locus. After all crosses were performed, the progeny were scored for NDJ to determine if the original mutation was still present.

Grant Support?

Supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health IDeA Networks for Biomedical Research Excellence (NIH-INBRE)

Course Assignment

BIOL 471 – Kohl

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Apr 21st, 2:15 PM

Mapping of a Female Meiotic Mutant, mei-S282, in Drosophila melanogaster

Richardson Ballroom

Meiosis is a specialized form of cell division responsible for the formation of haploid gametes utilized in sexual reproduction. During this process, meiotic recombination is essential to increase genetic diversity and ensure proper chromosome segregation. Mutations disrupting meiotic recombination can result in nondisjunction (NDJ), the failure of chromosomes to separate. Many such mutations have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster, including mei-S282. mei-S282 is a female meiotic mutant isolated in Italy in 1972, which is characterized by elevated NDJ at the first meiotic division and decreased recombination levels. While the overall goal of this research is to map mei-S282 to a precise locus, the purpose of this particular study is to determine whether the mei-S282 mutation is still present within the Drosophila stock received. Since the mutation’s approximate location has been previously mapped to position 5 on the third chromosome (3L), a deficiency of this region was crossed with our mei-S282 stock to generate homozygous female mutants at this locus. After all crosses were performed, the progeny were scored for NDJ to determine if the original mutation was still present.