Event Title

A Historical Analysis of Soteriology and its Application among Christians

Poster Number

01

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies

Honors Thesis Committee

Peter Judge, Ph.D.; William Kiblinger, Ph.D; and Dale Hathaway, M.Div, M.A.

Location

Rutledge

Start Date

21-4-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2017 2:00 PM

Description

This thesis explores the central theological topic of soteriology: the study of the fundamental Christian understanding of salvation in and through the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. More specifically, soteriology centers on theories of what is referred to in general as “atonement” or “justification.” Historically, theologians have relied on five models of justification: substitution, redemption, reconciliation, atonement, participation. The research relies first on a historical examination of how soteriology is expressed in Scripture and then on the writings of early church fathers, medieval theologians, Reformation thinkers, and modern and contemporary theologians. Primary sources, commentaries, and other secondary sources are used. The historical, theoretical research is supplemented with a qualitative survey of college-aged Christians’ perceptions of their personal beliefs about how salvation is accomplished. The intention of this survey is to observe what kind of correlation exists between formal theological interpretations and the lived experience of everyday Christians.

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Apr 21st, 12:00 PM Apr 21st, 2:00 PM

A Historical Analysis of Soteriology and its Application among Christians

Rutledge

This thesis explores the central theological topic of soteriology: the study of the fundamental Christian understanding of salvation in and through the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. More specifically, soteriology centers on theories of what is referred to in general as “atonement” or “justification.” Historically, theologians have relied on five models of justification: substitution, redemption, reconciliation, atonement, participation. The research relies first on a historical examination of how soteriology is expressed in Scripture and then on the writings of early church fathers, medieval theologians, Reformation thinkers, and modern and contemporary theologians. Primary sources, commentaries, and other secondary sources are used. The historical, theoretical research is supplemented with a qualitative survey of college-aged Christians’ perceptions of their personal beliefs about how salvation is accomplished. The intention of this survey is to observe what kind of correlation exists between formal theological interpretations and the lived experience of everyday Christians.