Event Title

How Underdeveloped Cities Contribute to the Lack of Gender Identity Education in American Youth

Faculty Mentor

Jennifer Disney, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Interdisciplinary Studies

Location

West Center, Room 219

Start Date

21-4-2017 3:15 PM

Description

While a majority of American children are typically perceived as highly educated, they are, in fact, enslaved by the chains of financial struggles within their own homes, communities, and cities. This financial constriction not only plays a vital role in their future mental health, but also their growth into adulthood. Too often, these youth in areas stricken with financial hardship are raised in gender-demanding homes, where they lack self-discovery time indispensible to their identity. When suffering cities tend to their underage children, gender identity educational opportunities tend to be inadequate or absent. Subsequently, children are forced to identify with one gender, which is usually determined by their parents. As a growing number of the American population are identifying with terms such as “gender-fluid,” “transgender,” and “gender non-conforming,” children in poorer cities are, unfortunately, barricaded from the ability to learn about the gender spectrum and where they may lie. This creates a widening gap between children raised in middle to upper-class homes and those in lower-class homes. Because our country is experiencing a shrinking middle class, and only a small portion of Americans are considered “upper-class citizens,” the remaining lower-class youth are oppressed financially through their lack of opportunity. Ultimately, the upper class remains privileged in gender identity security, something all Americans should be able to access.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Southeastern Women's Studies Association (SEWSA) Conference, Winthrop University, March 2016

Course Assignment

WMST 300 – Disney

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Apr 21st, 3:15 PM

How Underdeveloped Cities Contribute to the Lack of Gender Identity Education in American Youth

West Center, Room 219

While a majority of American children are typically perceived as highly educated, they are, in fact, enslaved by the chains of financial struggles within their own homes, communities, and cities. This financial constriction not only plays a vital role in their future mental health, but also their growth into adulthood. Too often, these youth in areas stricken with financial hardship are raised in gender-demanding homes, where they lack self-discovery time indispensible to their identity. When suffering cities tend to their underage children, gender identity educational opportunities tend to be inadequate or absent. Subsequently, children are forced to identify with one gender, which is usually determined by their parents. As a growing number of the American population are identifying with terms such as “gender-fluid,” “transgender,” and “gender non-conforming,” children in poorer cities are, unfortunately, barricaded from the ability to learn about the gender spectrum and where they may lie. This creates a widening gap between children raised in middle to upper-class homes and those in lower-class homes. Because our country is experiencing a shrinking middle class, and only a small portion of Americans are considered “upper-class citizens,” the remaining lower-class youth are oppressed financially through their lack of opportunity. Ultimately, the upper class remains privileged in gender identity security, something all Americans should be able to access.