Event Title

Strength Training and ACL Injury Prevention

Faculty Mentor

David Schary, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

DiGiorgio Campus Center, Room 114

Start Date

21-4-2017 3:15 PM

Description

This research project will show how strength training habits are related to the risk of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in high school male athletes. Strength training is classified as physical activity that uses resistance to build muscular strength. Research shows that, as muscles grow, the functional capabilities of the ligaments and tendons increase, as well. This could mean that strength training could help prevent ACL injuries. The ACL is a cruciate ligament that attaches the anterior part of the tibia to the posterior part of the femur and functions to prevent hyperextension. The ACL is subject to injury especially by tearing. ACL tears are one of the most common injuries in sports today. There has not been much research on what training methods best prevent ACL tears from occurring. This is because there are very few ways to measure the strength of an ACL specifically before it is injured. However, there are ways to look at the biomechanics of the knee joint and measure the functionality of the knee. Looking at the biomechanics of the knee can also help assess when that joint is under the greatest amount of stress and is most prone to an ACL tear. ACL tears are classified on a grade scale. From a grade 1 sprain, being mildly damaged, to a grade 3 sprain, being severely damaged. The goal of this research project will be to figure out whether strength training play a positive or negative role in ACL injuries before they happen. This research project also aims to explore what the most suitable training method is to best prevent ACL injuries before they happen.

Course Assignment

PESH 381 – Schary

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Apr 21st, 3:15 PM

Strength Training and ACL Injury Prevention

DiGiorgio Campus Center, Room 114

This research project will show how strength training habits are related to the risk of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in high school male athletes. Strength training is classified as physical activity that uses resistance to build muscular strength. Research shows that, as muscles grow, the functional capabilities of the ligaments and tendons increase, as well. This could mean that strength training could help prevent ACL injuries. The ACL is a cruciate ligament that attaches the anterior part of the tibia to the posterior part of the femur and functions to prevent hyperextension. The ACL is subject to injury especially by tearing. ACL tears are one of the most common injuries in sports today. There has not been much research on what training methods best prevent ACL tears from occurring. This is because there are very few ways to measure the strength of an ACL specifically before it is injured. However, there are ways to look at the biomechanics of the knee joint and measure the functionality of the knee. Looking at the biomechanics of the knee can also help assess when that joint is under the greatest amount of stress and is most prone to an ACL tear. ACL tears are classified on a grade scale. From a grade 1 sprain, being mildly damaged, to a grade 3 sprain, being severely damaged. The goal of this research project will be to figure out whether strength training play a positive or negative role in ACL injuries before they happen. This research project also aims to explore what the most suitable training method is to best prevent ACL injuries before they happen.