Event Title

The Effects of Technology on Low-Literate Learners

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy

Honors Thesis Committee

Bettie Parsons Barger, Ph.D.; Kavin Ming, Ed.D.; and Kimarie Whetstone, Ph.D.

Location

DiGiorgio Campus Center, Room 220

Start Date

21-4-2017 3:45 PM

Description

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the use of technology on the literacy development, specifically the engagement, motivation, and comprehension skills of low-literate learners. Literacy has always been the focus, but now technology is the new, exciting innovation in everyone’s daily life and it has implications in the educational setting. The use of this fresh technology is mandated in many schools. Therefore, teachers must ask themselves, “Is technology as beneficial as the idea of it is?” This study sets out to explore this question through the use of guided reading groups and one-to-one implementation of technology. Involving a review of literature that highlights the opportunities that students are offered for integrating technology and literacy in the classroom, this paper details the weekly literacy and technology interventions with a small reading group. This paper will also analyze the progression of student achievement throughout the weekly intervention during field-based research. The findings show increases in engagement, motivation, and comprehension skills among the third grade participants.

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Apr 21st, 3:45 PM

The Effects of Technology on Low-Literate Learners

DiGiorgio Campus Center, Room 220

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the use of technology on the literacy development, specifically the engagement, motivation, and comprehension skills of low-literate learners. Literacy has always been the focus, but now technology is the new, exciting innovation in everyone’s daily life and it has implications in the educational setting. The use of this fresh technology is mandated in many schools. Therefore, teachers must ask themselves, “Is technology as beneficial as the idea of it is?” This study sets out to explore this question through the use of guided reading groups and one-to-one implementation of technology. Involving a review of literature that highlights the opportunities that students are offered for integrating technology and literacy in the classroom, this paper details the weekly literacy and technology interventions with a small reading group. This paper will also analyze the progression of student achievement throughout the weekly intervention during field-based research. The findings show increases in engagement, motivation, and comprehension skills among the third grade participants.