Event Title

Hamlet and Myers-Briggs: A Jungian Analysis

Faculty Mentor

Matthew Fike, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of English

Location

West Center, Room 221

Start Date

21-4-2017 1:30 PM

Description

This paper aspires to use the Myers-Briggs system to categorize Hamlet into one of sixteen different personality types and identify where, how, and why his type is significant to the work as a whole. As an INTJ personality type, Hamlet is a methodical, reclusive individual. Consistent with this type, Hamlet’s strategic, efficacious nature gives us insight into the rationales behind his decision-making and additionally offers a rational explanation for his most egregious failures—particularly his hesitation (or lack thereof, in some situations). Many critics such as Kenneth Tucker and Sally Porterfield (among others) explore Hamlet’s psychology in depth. Throughout the play, Hamlet struggles with hesitation. A naturally introverted and contemplative individual, Hamlet’s eventual motivation to spring into action stems from his desire to attain revenge for both himself and his late father. When he uses his inherent calculated instincts to his advantage, the executions of his plans thrive. It is when he ignores these instincts that he makes several irreversible blunders. Ultimately, possessing a knowledge of Hamlet’s personality type can enhance our overall understanding of the work significantly. With this knowledge, we become better acquainted with Hamlet’s character and understand him as a three-dimensional person, not merely a two-dimensional character.

Course Assignment

ENGL 305 – Fike

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Apr 21st, 1:30 PM

Hamlet and Myers-Briggs: A Jungian Analysis

West Center, Room 221

This paper aspires to use the Myers-Briggs system to categorize Hamlet into one of sixteen different personality types and identify where, how, and why his type is significant to the work as a whole. As an INTJ personality type, Hamlet is a methodical, reclusive individual. Consistent with this type, Hamlet’s strategic, efficacious nature gives us insight into the rationales behind his decision-making and additionally offers a rational explanation for his most egregious failures—particularly his hesitation (or lack thereof, in some situations). Many critics such as Kenneth Tucker and Sally Porterfield (among others) explore Hamlet’s psychology in depth. Throughout the play, Hamlet struggles with hesitation. A naturally introverted and contemplative individual, Hamlet’s eventual motivation to spring into action stems from his desire to attain revenge for both himself and his late father. When he uses his inherent calculated instincts to his advantage, the executions of his plans thrive. It is when he ignores these instincts that he makes several irreversible blunders. Ultimately, possessing a knowledge of Hamlet’s personality type can enhance our overall understanding of the work significantly. With this knowledge, we become better acquainted with Hamlet’s character and understand him as a three-dimensional person, not merely a two-dimensional character.