Event Title

Implementing Resilience in Children of a Low Socio-Economic Status

Faculty Mentor

Bradley Witzel, Ed.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Counseling, Leadership, and Educational Studies

Location

West Center, Room 217

Start Date

21-4-2017 1:45 PM

Description

There are millions of children living in poverty. Unfortunately, many will continue living in the vicious cycle of generational poverty. Resiliency allows these children to positively adapt to their adversity. This study is looking at implementing resilience in children of a low socio-economic status. A mixed-methods methodology was implemented in order to figure out whether or not resiliency can be instilled using strategies formed within a previous study. Based on the post-assessment and qualitative interviews, the collective strategies did not lead to a significant increase in resiliency. However, interviews revealed changes in individual students’ classroom behavior indicating functional resiliency.

Previously Presented/Performed?

22nd Annual SAEOPP McNair/SSS Scholars Research Conference, Atlanta, Georgia, June 2016; Inclusion Conference, Winthrop University, November 2016; Annual SCCEC Professional Development Conference, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, February 2017

Comments

McNair Scholar

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Apr 21st, 1:45 PM

Implementing Resilience in Children of a Low Socio-Economic Status

West Center, Room 217

There are millions of children living in poverty. Unfortunately, many will continue living in the vicious cycle of generational poverty. Resiliency allows these children to positively adapt to their adversity. This study is looking at implementing resilience in children of a low socio-economic status. A mixed-methods methodology was implemented in order to figure out whether or not resiliency can be instilled using strategies formed within a previous study. Based on the post-assessment and qualitative interviews, the collective strategies did not lead to a significant increase in resiliency. However, interviews revealed changes in individual students’ classroom behavior indicating functional resiliency.