Event Title

White College Students' Attitudes Towards White Privilege

Poster Number

04

Faculty Mentor

Monique Constance-Huggins, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Social Work

Location

Rutledge

Start Date

21-4-2017 12:00 PM

Description

Skin color continues to play a major role in determining social and economic outcomes in our society. Yet many students, particularly Whites, are unaware of, or deny its role. This study seeks to examine attitudes towards White privilege among 50 White students at a small liberal arts college in the South. All students were between ages 18 and 24 and the majority of them (86%) were females. Using the White Privilege Attitude Scale (Pinterits, Spanierman & Poteat, 2009), results show that with a mean score of 92, students are moderately aware of White privilege. A closer look at the sub-domains, however, reveals that students scored lowest on the anticipated cost of addressing White privilege. That is, the majority of students are worried or apprehensive about addressing White privilege. This observation suggests that while students may recognize that there are inequalities in society, many of them may not be motivated enough to take social action to address these inequalities. This result holds important implications for teaching on cultural diversity.

Course Assignment

SCWK 330 – Constance-Huggins

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 21st, 12:00 PM

White College Students' Attitudes Towards White Privilege

Rutledge

Skin color continues to play a major role in determining social and economic outcomes in our society. Yet many students, particularly Whites, are unaware of, or deny its role. This study seeks to examine attitudes towards White privilege among 50 White students at a small liberal arts college in the South. All students were between ages 18 and 24 and the majority of them (86%) were females. Using the White Privilege Attitude Scale (Pinterits, Spanierman & Poteat, 2009), results show that with a mean score of 92, students are moderately aware of White privilege. A closer look at the sub-domains, however, reveals that students scored lowest on the anticipated cost of addressing White privilege. That is, the majority of students are worried or apprehensive about addressing White privilege. This observation suggests that while students may recognize that there are inequalities in society, many of them may not be motivated enough to take social action to address these inequalities. This result holds important implications for teaching on cultural diversity.