Event Title

Bridge-Enhanced ACL Repair (BEAR) Surgery and the Correlated Effects on Rehabilitation Time

Poster Number

15

Faculty Mentor

David Schary, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

Rutledge

Start Date

21-4-2017 12:00 PM

Description

The primary goal of this study is to research a new anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery method and compare it to the standard surgical method, ACL reconstruction surgery. The new method is Bridge-Enhanced ACL Repair surgery also known as the BEAR procedure. The ACL is unlike most other ligaments of our knee, because it lacks the ability to repair itself if torn. Because of this, the common surgical practice for many years has been ACL Reconstruction surgery. In this type of surgery, a surgeon will take a skin graft from another part of the patient’s body, primarily the hamstring, and use the graft to attach the two ends of the ACL back together. Due to this, patients who undergo ACL reconstruction surgery have an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. With the BEAR procedure, a surgeon can go in and place a bridge scaffold (a sponge) containing specialized proteins between the two torn sections of the ligament. After this, the surgeon then ties sutures to both ends of the ligament and pulls the two ends into the sponge, then injecting the sponge with the patient’s own blood. This creates an environment for clotting inside the sponge, enabling the two torn ends of the ligament to grow back together and repair themselves. Early studies show that this new surgical method can reduce the rehabilitation time for an individual who has suffered an ACL tear and decrease his or her risk of developing osteoarthritis.

Course Assignment

PESH 381 – Schary

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Apr 21st, 12:00 PM

Bridge-Enhanced ACL Repair (BEAR) Surgery and the Correlated Effects on Rehabilitation Time

Rutledge

The primary goal of this study is to research a new anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery method and compare it to the standard surgical method, ACL reconstruction surgery. The new method is Bridge-Enhanced ACL Repair surgery also known as the BEAR procedure. The ACL is unlike most other ligaments of our knee, because it lacks the ability to repair itself if torn. Because of this, the common surgical practice for many years has been ACL Reconstruction surgery. In this type of surgery, a surgeon will take a skin graft from another part of the patient’s body, primarily the hamstring, and use the graft to attach the two ends of the ACL back together. Due to this, patients who undergo ACL reconstruction surgery have an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis. With the BEAR procedure, a surgeon can go in and place a bridge scaffold (a sponge) containing specialized proteins between the two torn sections of the ligament. After this, the surgeon then ties sutures to both ends of the ligament and pulls the two ends into the sponge, then injecting the sponge with the patient’s own blood. This creates an environment for clotting inside the sponge, enabling the two torn ends of the ligament to grow back together and repair themselves. Early studies show that this new surgical method can reduce the rehabilitation time for an individual who has suffered an ACL tear and decrease his or her risk of developing osteoarthritis.