Event Title

Epigenetic modifiers 5-azacytidine and trichostatin A alter adipose-derived stem cell gene expression.

Faculty Mentor

Matthew Stern, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Biology

Location

DiGiorgio Campus Center, Room 220

Start Date

21-4-2017 1:15 PM

Description

Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent, mesenchymal stem cells that are found within the microvasculature of adipose tissue. While ADSCs have the potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages, they cannot match the differentiation potential of pluripotent stem cells. ADSCs can be epigenetically manipulated in order to increase their developmental potency. An enhanced state of ADSC developmental potency could be particularly beneficial in efforts to drive the cells into specific lineages, like skeletal muscle, that are not among those most readily produced by ADSCs. If successful, such a method could provide an easily accessible source of autologous myogenic cells for skeletal muscle regeneration and tissue engineering. We hypothesized that exposure to the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, and prevention of DNA methylation by 5-azacytidine, would alter the epigenome of ADSCs in a way that enhances developmental potency and enables more efficient myogenic differentiation. Our results suggest that the epigenetic modifiers did indeed alter gene expression in ADSCs. We observed changes in the expression of genes associated with enhanced differentiation potential, as well as genes associated with the myogenic lineage. In the future, we would like to optimize the combination of epigenetic modifiers, in order to generate ADSCs with the most myogenic potential. We will then combine those cells with a porcine acellular muscle matrix scaffold to study the potential of ADSCs to be used in skeletal muscle tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

Previously Presented/Performed?

South Carolina INBRE symposium, Columbia, South Carolina, August 2016; South Carolina Academy of Science Annual Meeting, Coastal Carolina University, March 2017

Grant Support?

Supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health IDeA Networks for Biomedical Research Excellence (NIH-INBRE)

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Apr 21st, 1:15 PM

Epigenetic modifiers 5-azacytidine and trichostatin A alter adipose-derived stem cell gene expression.

DiGiorgio Campus Center, Room 220

Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent, mesenchymal stem cells that are found within the microvasculature of adipose tissue. While ADSCs have the potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages, they cannot match the differentiation potential of pluripotent stem cells. ADSCs can be epigenetically manipulated in order to increase their developmental potency. An enhanced state of ADSC developmental potency could be particularly beneficial in efforts to drive the cells into specific lineages, like skeletal muscle, that are not among those most readily produced by ADSCs. If successful, such a method could provide an easily accessible source of autologous myogenic cells for skeletal muscle regeneration and tissue engineering. We hypothesized that exposure to the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, and prevention of DNA methylation by 5-azacytidine, would alter the epigenome of ADSCs in a way that enhances developmental potency and enables more efficient myogenic differentiation. Our results suggest that the epigenetic modifiers did indeed alter gene expression in ADSCs. We observed changes in the expression of genes associated with enhanced differentiation potential, as well as genes associated with the myogenic lineage. In the future, we would like to optimize the combination of epigenetic modifiers, in order to generate ADSCs with the most myogenic potential. We will then combine those cells with a porcine acellular muscle matrix scaffold to study the potential of ADSCs to be used in skeletal muscle tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.