Event Title

Effectiveness of Prehospital Administration of Antibiotics for Instances of Severe Sepsis

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Jason Hurlbert

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Chemistry, Physics and Geology
Biology

Honors Thesis Committee

Jason Hurlbert, Ph.D.; Victoria Frost, Ph.D.; Meir Barak, Ph.D., D.V.M.

Location

West Center, Room 217

Start Date

22-4-2016 2:45 PM

End Date

22-4-2016 3:00 PM

Description

Prehospital intervention for conditions with high mortality such as acute coronary syndrome (ACS), myocardial infarctions (MI), and strokes (CVA) has greatly improved patient care and ultimately patient outcomes. Sepsis is a life-threatening condition with a reported mortality higher than that those of MI and CVA. Current guidelines do little to suggest a universal approach to prehospital treatment and evaluation of potentially septic patients. This review of current published research aims to investigate potential determinants for septic diagnosis and determine optimal prehosital treatment protocols. The best diagnostic measurement available to EMS personnel is a serum lactate concentration determination. Following diagnosis, the current formalized treatment protocol for sepsis is fluid resuscitation and supplemental oxygenation. THis review has found that early initiation of antibiotic treatment is an important factor in determining patient outcomes which suggests that prehospital use of antibiotics would prove beneficial to diagnosed septic patients. With an increasing number of patients using emergency medical services (EMS) for medical transportation it is a viable option for EMS personnel to begin antibiotic therapy having had proper education for both evaluation and subsequent treatment of patients prior to hospital admission. This review identifies both the benefits and concerns of prehospital usage of antibiotics in addition to identifying the problems of ineffective diagnostic education regarding sepsis received by EMS personnel.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 22nd, 2:45 PM Apr 22nd, 3:00 PM

Effectiveness of Prehospital Administration of Antibiotics for Instances of Severe Sepsis

West Center, Room 217

Prehospital intervention for conditions with high mortality such as acute coronary syndrome (ACS), myocardial infarctions (MI), and strokes (CVA) has greatly improved patient care and ultimately patient outcomes. Sepsis is a life-threatening condition with a reported mortality higher than that those of MI and CVA. Current guidelines do little to suggest a universal approach to prehospital treatment and evaluation of potentially septic patients. This review of current published research aims to investigate potential determinants for septic diagnosis and determine optimal prehosital treatment protocols. The best diagnostic measurement available to EMS personnel is a serum lactate concentration determination. Following diagnosis, the current formalized treatment protocol for sepsis is fluid resuscitation and supplemental oxygenation. THis review has found that early initiation of antibiotic treatment is an important factor in determining patient outcomes which suggests that prehospital use of antibiotics would prove beneficial to diagnosed septic patients. With an increasing number of patients using emergency medical services (EMS) for medical transportation it is a viable option for EMS personnel to begin antibiotic therapy having had proper education for both evaluation and subsequent treatment of patients prior to hospital admission. This review identifies both the benefits and concerns of prehospital usage of antibiotics in addition to identifying the problems of ineffective diagnostic education regarding sepsis received by EMS personnel.