Event Title

Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Intolerance of Uncertainty and Facial Interpretation

Poster Number

20

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Merry Sleigh

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Location

Rutledge

Start Date

22-4-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

22-4-2016 2:00 PM

Description

Research has shown that sleep deprivation is associated with inhibited interpretation of emotions. Our study examined adults’ reactions to uncertain feelings and neutral facial stimuli in the context of sleep patterns. We hypothesized that participants with poorer sleep quality would be less tolerant of uncertainty and more likely to interpret faces negatively. Participants were 81 adults with a mean age of 19.90. We selected neutrally coded images from the Chicago Face Database (CFD). Participants then indicated on a continuum which emotion they perceived. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS) was used to evaluate emotional responses to uncertainty. Sleep quality was assessed with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Higher scores on both sleep measures indicated increased sleep deprivation. Results revealed that the higher the participants’ intolerance of uncertainty, the higher the ESS and PSQI. In support of our hypothesis, these results revealed that poor sleep was associated with increased intolerance of uncertainty. However, participants’ responses to neutral faces were not related to sleep. In sum, lowered tolerance of uncertainty from lack of sleep has the potential to impact an individual’s emotional perceptions. However, similar facial interpretation data suggests that sleep only impacts specific aspects of emotional functioning. These findings further add to our understanding of sleep’s psychological impact.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Annual Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana, April 2016

Awards Won

Winner, Psi Chi Regional Research Award, SEPA Annual Meeting, April 2016

Course Assignment

Research Methods, PSYC 302, Merry Sleigh

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Apr 22nd, 12:00 PM Apr 22nd, 2:00 PM

Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Intolerance of Uncertainty and Facial Interpretation

Rutledge

Research has shown that sleep deprivation is associated with inhibited interpretation of emotions. Our study examined adults’ reactions to uncertain feelings and neutral facial stimuli in the context of sleep patterns. We hypothesized that participants with poorer sleep quality would be less tolerant of uncertainty and more likely to interpret faces negatively. Participants were 81 adults with a mean age of 19.90. We selected neutrally coded images from the Chicago Face Database (CFD). Participants then indicated on a continuum which emotion they perceived. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS) was used to evaluate emotional responses to uncertainty. Sleep quality was assessed with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Higher scores on both sleep measures indicated increased sleep deprivation. Results revealed that the higher the participants’ intolerance of uncertainty, the higher the ESS and PSQI. In support of our hypothesis, these results revealed that poor sleep was associated with increased intolerance of uncertainty. However, participants’ responses to neutral faces were not related to sleep. In sum, lowered tolerance of uncertainty from lack of sleep has the potential to impact an individual’s emotional perceptions. However, similar facial interpretation data suggests that sleep only impacts specific aspects of emotional functioning. These findings further add to our understanding of sleep’s psychological impact.