Event Title

Individualized Instruction for First Graders in Poverty

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Bettie Parsons Barger

College

College of Education

Department

Curriculum and Pedagogy

Honors Thesis Committee

Bettie Parsons Barger, Ph.D.; Scott Rademaker, Ph.D.; Carol Marchel, Ph.D.

Location

West Center, Room 217

Start Date

22-4-2016 3:15 PM

End Date

22-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

Within the field of education, Hagans and Good state that children in poverty have fewer opportunities to engage in literacy-enriching activities. They go on to say that children in poverty are at a disadvantage for language development and reading, as compared to their peers from families of mid- to high socioeconomic status (SES). Unfortunately, students who struggle with reading in early grades are at significantly greater risk to struggle academically, creating a large gap in skills. Research shows that children learn more efficiently across subjects when their learning is individualized. Children in poverty need individualized instruction from a highly qualified teacher, or an assistant or volunteer who is under close supervision from the host teacher. This study explores the impact of balanced, individualized literacy instruction, with meaningful reading experiences, guided by relevant assessment data. Three students in poverty met weekly for 30 minutes with a researcher for individualized literacy instruction. The findings are highlighted in this action-research study.

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Apr 22nd, 3:15 PM Apr 22nd, 3:30 PM

Individualized Instruction for First Graders in Poverty

West Center, Room 217

Within the field of education, Hagans and Good state that children in poverty have fewer opportunities to engage in literacy-enriching activities. They go on to say that children in poverty are at a disadvantage for language development and reading, as compared to their peers from families of mid- to high socioeconomic status (SES). Unfortunately, students who struggle with reading in early grades are at significantly greater risk to struggle academically, creating a large gap in skills. Research shows that children learn more efficiently across subjects when their learning is individualized. Children in poverty need individualized instruction from a highly qualified teacher, or an assistant or volunteer who is under close supervision from the host teacher. This study explores the impact of balanced, individualized literacy instruction, with meaningful reading experiences, guided by relevant assessment data. Three students in poverty met weekly for 30 minutes with a researcher for individualized literacy instruction. The findings are highlighted in this action-research study.