Event Title

Motivational Patterns of Fibromyalgia Patients to Be Physically Active

Poster Number

38

Presenter Information

Jocelyn Hydeia LeafFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. David Schary

College

College of Education

Department

Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

Richardson Ballroom

Start Date

22-4-2016 2:15 PM

End Date

22-4-2016 4:15 PM

Description

Fibromyalgia (FM) is a rare chronic pain disorder that affects the joints and muscles, it is especially common among women with arthritis. FM negatively affects sleeping patterns, mood, fatigue, and cognitive functioning. Currently, there is no known cure for FM but physical activity has been shown to help reduce symptoms like pain and depression. Despite these benefits, it is often hard to motivate individuals suffering from FM to be physically active because of their current levels of pain. To help increase physical activity levels among those with FM, health practitioners need effective motivational strategies. Thus, the purpose of this research project is to explore the motivational patterns of individuals with FM suffering from pain to participate in physical activity, exercise, and/or rehabilitation. Comparing motivation to exercise with causes of pain, this exploratory research project will help uncover the motivational patterns of individuals suffering from FM. The sample will consist of patients (n = 25; ages 45 – 65 years old) from Fitness after Rehab (F.A.R.), a rehabilitation program for individuals currently suffering from FM.

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Apr 22nd, 2:15 PM Apr 22nd, 4:15 PM

Motivational Patterns of Fibromyalgia Patients to Be Physically Active

Richardson Ballroom

Fibromyalgia (FM) is a rare chronic pain disorder that affects the joints and muscles, it is especially common among women with arthritis. FM negatively affects sleeping patterns, mood, fatigue, and cognitive functioning. Currently, there is no known cure for FM but physical activity has been shown to help reduce symptoms like pain and depression. Despite these benefits, it is often hard to motivate individuals suffering from FM to be physically active because of their current levels of pain. To help increase physical activity levels among those with FM, health practitioners need effective motivational strategies. Thus, the purpose of this research project is to explore the motivational patterns of individuals with FM suffering from pain to participate in physical activity, exercise, and/or rehabilitation. Comparing motivation to exercise with causes of pain, this exploratory research project will help uncover the motivational patterns of individuals suffering from FM. The sample will consist of patients (n = 25; ages 45 – 65 years old) from Fitness after Rehab (F.A.R.), a rehabilitation program for individuals currently suffering from FM.