Event Title

Technology Use and Pretests in College Math Courses

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Mary Pat Sjostrom

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Mathematics

Honors Thesis Committee

Mary Pat Sjostrom, Ph.D.; Kristen Abernathy, Ph.D.; Kimberly Hope, M.M.

Location

West Center,Room 217

Start Date

22-4-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

22-4-2016 2:45 PM

Description

In mathematics education, identifying the optimal method for assessing student knowledge is an ongoing challenge for instructors and it can be the determining factor for student understanding. College mathematics professors often do not administer pretests at the beginning of the course to assess the prior knowledge of students. Though it is not required for professors to know the level of knowledge their students have, it could be helpful for students to know their own performance before learning new material or taking a graded exam. Students would know what skills they are not proficient in and revise their studying to address those gaps in understanding. For future math educators, knowing how to assess students in math is important since every student learns differently and educators want to ensure students understand content material with minimal rote memorization and formula use. In this thesis, I will evaluate the results of a pretest from an introductory College Algebra course and the results from a survey about the students’ self-analysis of their performance.

Previously Presented/Performed?

National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR), Asheville, North Carolina, April 2016

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Apr 22nd, 2:30 PM Apr 22nd, 2:45 PM

Technology Use and Pretests in College Math Courses

West Center,Room 217

In mathematics education, identifying the optimal method for assessing student knowledge is an ongoing challenge for instructors and it can be the determining factor for student understanding. College mathematics professors often do not administer pretests at the beginning of the course to assess the prior knowledge of students. Though it is not required for professors to know the level of knowledge their students have, it could be helpful for students to know their own performance before learning new material or taking a graded exam. Students would know what skills they are not proficient in and revise their studying to address those gaps in understanding. For future math educators, knowing how to assess students in math is important since every student learns differently and educators want to ensure students understand content material with minimal rote memorization and formula use. In this thesis, I will evaluate the results of a pretest from an introductory College Algebra course and the results from a survey about the students’ self-analysis of their performance.