Event Title

Investigating the Role of an Lpar2 Variant (ChEST973j21) in CellularSignaling in B103 Neuroblastoma Cells

Poster Number

36

Presenter Information

Han-Hua HsuFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Eric Birgbauer

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Biology

Location

Richardson Ballroom

Start Date

22-4-2016 2:15 PM

End Date

22-4-2016 4:15 PM

Description

Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lysophospholipid mediator that is involved in diverse biological activities and is well known as an extracellular signaling molecule. Fincher et al (2014) found that LPA induces growth cone collapse and neurite retraction in the embryonic retinal axons of the chicken embryo. LPA can be found abundantly in various cells and tissues at varying concentrations. Many studies link LPA to human cancer and have shown that Lpar2 is highly expressed in several human organs and tumorigenesis. We discovered a chicken cDNA clone (ChEST973j21) that is partially identical to chicken Lpar2 at the nucleotide level and we considered this chicken cDNA clone (ChEST973j21) as a Lpar2 variant. ChEST973j21 consists of a fragment (from 125bp to 490bp) that matches to bases 1 to 367 in Lpar2, and while the rest of the sequence diverges. This study focus is on identifying the biological functions of ChEST973j21 in cellular signaling and response in B103 neuroblastoma cells by comparing with Lpar2 from chicken brain, specifically as ChEST97j21 relates to Lpar2. B103 cells normally do not express LPA receptors and do not respond to LPA. We cloned ChEST973j21 and Lpar2 into a mammalian expression vector to express them in B103 cells. We are testing them in B103 cells exposed to LPA to investigate the role of this Lpar2 variant (ChEST973j21) in B103 cells compared to Lpar2 in LPA signaling. This study aims to discover whether ChEST97j21 could be a new LPA receptor that responds to and/or may be regulated by LPA.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Symposium for Young Neurosciences and Professors of the Southeast (SYNAPSE), Presbyterian College, April 2016
Seminar, Department of Biology, Winthrop University, April 2016

Grant Support?

Supported by a grant from the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health

Course Assignment

Undergraduate Research in Biology, BIOL 471, Eric Birgbauer

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Apr 22nd, 2:15 PM Apr 22nd, 4:15 PM

Investigating the Role of an Lpar2 Variant (ChEST973j21) in CellularSignaling in B103 Neuroblastoma Cells

Richardson Ballroom

Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lysophospholipid mediator that is involved in diverse biological activities and is well known as an extracellular signaling molecule. Fincher et al (2014) found that LPA induces growth cone collapse and neurite retraction in the embryonic retinal axons of the chicken embryo. LPA can be found abundantly in various cells and tissues at varying concentrations. Many studies link LPA to human cancer and have shown that Lpar2 is highly expressed in several human organs and tumorigenesis. We discovered a chicken cDNA clone (ChEST973j21) that is partially identical to chicken Lpar2 at the nucleotide level and we considered this chicken cDNA clone (ChEST973j21) as a Lpar2 variant. ChEST973j21 consists of a fragment (from 125bp to 490bp) that matches to bases 1 to 367 in Lpar2, and while the rest of the sequence diverges. This study focus is on identifying the biological functions of ChEST973j21 in cellular signaling and response in B103 neuroblastoma cells by comparing with Lpar2 from chicken brain, specifically as ChEST97j21 relates to Lpar2. B103 cells normally do not express LPA receptors and do not respond to LPA. We cloned ChEST973j21 and Lpar2 into a mammalian expression vector to express them in B103 cells. We are testing them in B103 cells exposed to LPA to investigate the role of this Lpar2 variant (ChEST973j21) in B103 cells compared to Lpar2 in LPA signaling. This study aims to discover whether ChEST97j21 could be a new LPA receptor that responds to and/or may be regulated by LPA.