Event Title

Social Support and Cognitive Flexibility Linked to Resilience to Depression

Poster Number

12

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Sarah Reiland

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Location

Rutledge

Start Date

22-4-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

22-4-2016 2:00 PM

Description

This study examined the relationships among cognitive factors, perceived social support (PSS), and depression symptoms in 251 undergraduate students. Previous research in this population has shown that cognitive inflexibility and negative world beliefs are associated with greater depression symptoms. We examined the additional influence of PSS on both cognitions and depression. Regression analyses revealed that cognitive variables were more strongly related to depression than PSS was. Additionally, cognitive variables partially mediated the relationship between PSS and depression symptoms. Preliminary data from a pilot sample of 15 older adults with cognitive impairments suggest that social support may be particularly helpful for increasing resilience in older adults. This study demonstrates that social support might have an important effect on both cognitions and depression.

Previously Presented/Performed?

SAEOPP McNair/SSS Scholars Research Conference, Atlanta, Georgia, June 2015 Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Annual Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana, April 2016

Awards Won

Winner, Psi Chi Regional Research Award, SEPA Annual Meeting, April 2016

Course Assignment

Independent Research in Psychology

Comments

McNair Scholar

Journal of Psychological Inquiry, 2016, Under review

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Apr 22nd, 12:00 PM Apr 22nd, 2:00 PM

Social Support and Cognitive Flexibility Linked to Resilience to Depression

Rutledge

This study examined the relationships among cognitive factors, perceived social support (PSS), and depression symptoms in 251 undergraduate students. Previous research in this population has shown that cognitive inflexibility and negative world beliefs are associated with greater depression symptoms. We examined the additional influence of PSS on both cognitions and depression. Regression analyses revealed that cognitive variables were more strongly related to depression than PSS was. Additionally, cognitive variables partially mediated the relationship between PSS and depression symptoms. Preliminary data from a pilot sample of 15 older adults with cognitive impairments suggest that social support may be particularly helpful for increasing resilience in older adults. This study demonstrates that social support might have an important effect on both cognitions and depression.