Event Title

Relationship among Semaphorin-3A, Beta-site Amyloid Precursor Protein-cleaving Enzyme 1, and Growth Cone Collapse in the Developing Chick Visual System

Poster Number

11

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Eric Birgbauer

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Biology

Location

Rutledge

Start Date

22-4-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

22-4-2016 2:00 PM

Description

Semaphorin-3A (Sema3A) is widely known to be an important axon guidance molecule in the developing nervous system. Specifically, it has been found to be involved in distinct pathways in chick dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells and olfactory axons in the chick olfactory bulb. Recently, researchers found that a potential drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease, an inhibitor of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), may interfere with Sema3A mechanisms to regulate axon guidance in thalamic and hippocampal neurons in mice (Barão et al., 2015). There is limited information about the relationship between BACE1 and Sema3A in the developing chick visual system. The present study seeks to examine the effects of varying concentrations of Sema3A in retinal ganglion cells in the chick model. We hypothesize that higher concentrations of Sema3A will result in proportionately higher growth cone collapse and plateau at a certain concentration, as seen in a previous study on DRGs (Manns et al., 2012). We also seek to examine the effects of the inhibition of BACE1 on Sema3A in retinal ganglion cells. Our findings will improve the understanding of the role of Sema3A in the visual system and hopefully shed light on the importance of caution when using inhibitors, such as BACE1, for treatment.

Grant Support?

Supported by a grant from the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health

Comments

McNair Scholar

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Apr 22nd, 12:00 PM Apr 22nd, 2:00 PM

Relationship among Semaphorin-3A, Beta-site Amyloid Precursor Protein-cleaving Enzyme 1, and Growth Cone Collapse in the Developing Chick Visual System

Rutledge

Semaphorin-3A (Sema3A) is widely known to be an important axon guidance molecule in the developing nervous system. Specifically, it has been found to be involved in distinct pathways in chick dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells and olfactory axons in the chick olfactory bulb. Recently, researchers found that a potential drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease, an inhibitor of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), may interfere with Sema3A mechanisms to regulate axon guidance in thalamic and hippocampal neurons in mice (Barão et al., 2015). There is limited information about the relationship between BACE1 and Sema3A in the developing chick visual system. The present study seeks to examine the effects of varying concentrations of Sema3A in retinal ganglion cells in the chick model. We hypothesize that higher concentrations of Sema3A will result in proportionately higher growth cone collapse and plateau at a certain concentration, as seen in a previous study on DRGs (Manns et al., 2012). We also seek to examine the effects of the inhibition of BACE1 on Sema3A in retinal ganglion cells. Our findings will improve the understanding of the role of Sema3A in the visual system and hopefully shed light on the importance of caution when using inhibitors, such as BACE1, for treatment.