Event Title

The Role of Different Types of Social Capital on First Generation Students’ Academic Self-Concept and Success

Poster Number

32

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Monique Constance-Huggins

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Social Work

Location

Richardson Ballroom

Start Date

22-4-2016 2:15 PM

End Date

22-4-2016 4:15 PM

Description

Social capital has been shown to have a significant impact on one’s ability to overcome life’s challenges and to be successful. This includes overcoming challenges on college campuses. First generation students are often faced with major challenges on college campuses, however little is known about the extent to which they use social capital to address these challenges. This study examines differences in social capital use between first generation and non-first generation students among a sample of 66 college students at a small liberal arts college. Results suggest that first generation students tend to rely more on bridging social capital and less on bonding social capital than non-first generation students. Implications for improving academic success for first generation students are discussed.

Course Assignment

Special Topics in Social Work: Social Capital & Academic Achievement, First Generation Students, SCWK 550C, Monique Constance-Huggins

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 22nd, 2:15 PM Apr 22nd, 4:15 PM

The Role of Different Types of Social Capital on First Generation Students’ Academic Self-Concept and Success

Richardson Ballroom

Social capital has been shown to have a significant impact on one’s ability to overcome life’s challenges and to be successful. This includes overcoming challenges on college campuses. First generation students are often faced with major challenges on college campuses, however little is known about the extent to which they use social capital to address these challenges. This study examines differences in social capital use between first generation and non-first generation students among a sample of 66 college students at a small liberal arts college. Results suggest that first generation students tend to rely more on bridging social capital and less on bonding social capital than non-first generation students. Implications for improving academic success for first generation students are discussed.