Event Title

Quantification of Pseudouridine Modifications through UridineSpecific Cleavage of RNA

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Balasubrahmanyam Addepalli and Dr. Patrick Limbach,University of Cincinnati

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Chemistry, Physics and Geology

Location

DiGiorgio Campus Center, Room 220

Start Date

22-4-2016 3:15 PM

End Date

22-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

Pseudouridine (Ψ), an isomer of uridine (U), is the most common post-transcriptional modification found in RNA (1). Detection and quantification of pseudouridine (Y) in RNA is challenging. The available chemical detection methods are not quantitative. Recently reported mass spectrometry-based methods in this direction include relative quantification of hydrolysis products (base vs nucleoside) in collision-induced dissociation, and pseudouridine-specific SRM (Selected Reaction Monitoring) transition based absolute quantification. These approaches are effective in dealing with modification at a single sequence location. Our goal is to develop an assay that can quantify multiple modifications in a given oligonucleotide. This is done by uridine specific cleavage through hydrazinolysis. Pseudouridine is immune to hydrazine addition compared to uridine. This assay can be used to understand the functional role of multiple contiguous modifications, such as those in the subunit interface and the peptidyltransferase center of 23S rRNA.

Grant Support?

Supported by a National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates (NSF REU) Program and a grant from the National Institutes of Health

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Apr 22nd, 3:15 PM Apr 22nd, 3:30 PM

Quantification of Pseudouridine Modifications through UridineSpecific Cleavage of RNA

DiGiorgio Campus Center, Room 220

Pseudouridine (Ψ), an isomer of uridine (U), is the most common post-transcriptional modification found in RNA (1). Detection and quantification of pseudouridine (Y) in RNA is challenging. The available chemical detection methods are not quantitative. Recently reported mass spectrometry-based methods in this direction include relative quantification of hydrolysis products (base vs nucleoside) in collision-induced dissociation, and pseudouridine-specific SRM (Selected Reaction Monitoring) transition based absolute quantification. These approaches are effective in dealing with modification at a single sequence location. Our goal is to develop an assay that can quantify multiple modifications in a given oligonucleotide. This is done by uridine specific cleavage through hydrazinolysis. Pseudouridine is immune to hydrazine addition compared to uridine. This assay can be used to understand the functional role of multiple contiguous modifications, such as those in the subunit interface and the peptidyltransferase center of 23S rRNA.