Event Title

Relations among Materialism, Morality, and Concealment

Poster Number

07

Presenter Information

Leah Brown, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor

Merry Sleigh, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Location

Richardson Ballroom

Start Date

24-4-2015 1:20 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 2:50 PM

Description

This study looked at the relationships between materialism and morality, materialism and concealment, and morality and self-monitoring. Since materialism is more of a self-oriented characteristic and morality is more focused on the well-being of others, we hypothesized that young adults who have higher moral values (which are also portrayed outwardly) will be less materialistic and young adults who are more materialistic will have lower morality. We hypothesized that materialism would be highly correlated with concealment, based on the assumption that materialism may be used to conceal insecurities. In regard to morality and self-monitoring, we hypothesized that morality would be highly correlated with self-monitoring based on the assumption that moral behavior can be a form of self-monitoring. Participants (n = 85) completed the Materialism Scale (Richins & Dawson, 1992) and the Self-Concealment Scale (Larson & Chastain, 1990). Then, participants answered nine questions created by the researchers to assess morality, self-image, and the extent to which materialism manifests in moral behaviors (e.g., “I think I am good-looking”). Participants also responded to the Self-Monitoring Scale (Lennox & Wolfe, 1984). Last, participants completed a word completion task that measured morality (Gino & Desai, 2011). Results showed that people who are materialistic are not necessarily less moral than non-materialistic people and that morality does not relate to self-monitoring. Results also showed that materialism does not relate to self-concealment. This study suggests that moral actions are not always motivated by moral purposes and that people do not behave morally as a form of materialism.

Comments

Leah Brown is a McNair Scholar.

Presented at the 2014 American Psychological Association Annual Convention, August 2014

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Apr 24th, 1:20 PM Apr 24th, 2:50 PM

Relations among Materialism, Morality, and Concealment

Richardson Ballroom

This study looked at the relationships between materialism and morality, materialism and concealment, and morality and self-monitoring. Since materialism is more of a self-oriented characteristic and morality is more focused on the well-being of others, we hypothesized that young adults who have higher moral values (which are also portrayed outwardly) will be less materialistic and young adults who are more materialistic will have lower morality. We hypothesized that materialism would be highly correlated with concealment, based on the assumption that materialism may be used to conceal insecurities. In regard to morality and self-monitoring, we hypothesized that morality would be highly correlated with self-monitoring based on the assumption that moral behavior can be a form of self-monitoring. Participants (n = 85) completed the Materialism Scale (Richins & Dawson, 1992) and the Self-Concealment Scale (Larson & Chastain, 1990). Then, participants answered nine questions created by the researchers to assess morality, self-image, and the extent to which materialism manifests in moral behaviors (e.g., “I think I am good-looking”). Participants also responded to the Self-Monitoring Scale (Lennox & Wolfe, 1984). Last, participants completed a word completion task that measured morality (Gino & Desai, 2011). Results showed that people who are materialistic are not necessarily less moral than non-materialistic people and that morality does not relate to self-monitoring. Results also showed that materialism does not relate to self-concealment. This study suggests that moral actions are not always motivated by moral purposes and that people do not behave morally as a form of materialism.