Event Title

The Effects of Drawing, Listening, and Writing on Mood

Poster Number

06

Presenter Information

Leah Brown, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor

Merry Sleigh, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Location

Richardson Ballroom

Start Date

24-4-2015 3:20 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 4:50 PM

Description

Moods have the power to affect how a person views the world and may be more influential in directing a person’s life than the actual events that the person encounters (Burke, 2013; Thayer, 1997). This study compared the effectiveness of four mood management strategies. Participants (n = 139) were primed, using a written exercise, to be in a negative mood and then completed the PANAS (Positive and Negative Affect Scale; Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988), which confirmed that the priming had elicited similar negative moods across conditions. Each participant was then assigned to a mood management condition (music listening, nature listening, written reframing, drawing) or a control condition. Immediately afterward, participants completed the same mood assessment. Results revealed that music listening was most influential in decreasing a negative mood. Writing and music listening were both equally effective and more effective than the other strategies in increasing a positive mood. Nature listening was least effective in improving mood. Music changed participants’ moods and participants accurately perceived the greatest mood change in the music condition. Participants also exhibited inaccurate perceptions. The control changed the least in actual mood change scores but perceived that they changed as much as participants in the music condition. When participants were asked about usefulness of strategies in real-life, they ranked music as their top choice, reflecting some everyday usage of this helpful strategy. This study supports the findings of previous research, showing that listening to music and writing are very powerful mood-improving strategies.

Comments

Leah Brown is a McNair Scholar.

Published in Journal of Psychological Inquiry, 2015, In press

Presented at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, August 2014

Finalist, Raymond Corsini Student Poster Award, American Psychological Association Division One, August 2014

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Apr 24th, 3:20 PM Apr 24th, 4:50 PM

The Effects of Drawing, Listening, and Writing on Mood

Richardson Ballroom

Moods have the power to affect how a person views the world and may be more influential in directing a person’s life than the actual events that the person encounters (Burke, 2013; Thayer, 1997). This study compared the effectiveness of four mood management strategies. Participants (n = 139) were primed, using a written exercise, to be in a negative mood and then completed the PANAS (Positive and Negative Affect Scale; Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988), which confirmed that the priming had elicited similar negative moods across conditions. Each participant was then assigned to a mood management condition (music listening, nature listening, written reframing, drawing) or a control condition. Immediately afterward, participants completed the same mood assessment. Results revealed that music listening was most influential in decreasing a negative mood. Writing and music listening were both equally effective and more effective than the other strategies in increasing a positive mood. Nature listening was least effective in improving mood. Music changed participants’ moods and participants accurately perceived the greatest mood change in the music condition. Participants also exhibited inaccurate perceptions. The control changed the least in actual mood change scores but perceived that they changed as much as participants in the music condition. When participants were asked about usefulness of strategies in real-life, they ranked music as their top choice, reflecting some everyday usage of this helpful strategy. This study supports the findings of previous research, showing that listening to music and writing are very powerful mood-improving strategies.