Event Title

Romantic Relationship Satisfaction and Non-violent Risky Behavior of College Students

Poster Number

03

Presenter Information

Austin Bischoff, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor

Donna Nelson, Ph.D.; Kathy Lyon, Ph.D.; Tara Collins, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Location

Richardson Ballroom

Start Date

24-4-2015 1:20 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 2:50 PM

Description

The years we spend in college offer college students a way to experience new things, gain individuality, and develop romantic relationships; however, this time is also known for the surfacing of non-violent risky behaviors among college students. Involvement in a romantic relationship and satisfaction with that relationship might relate to subjective well-being, perceptions of stress, and the practice of non-violent risky behaviors. We expect that individuals who are involved in satisfying romantic relationships will experience greater well-being and less subjective stress compared to those in non-satisfying relationships or single persons. This may result in less involvement in risky behaviors such as alcohol and drug use for those in satisfying, committed relationships. We will examine other types of risky behavior as well, including consensual sex. We expect greater involvement in consensual sex for persons in committed relationships. We also expect a positive association between relationship satisfaction and consensual sex. We will assess well-being, perceptions of stress, and involvement in risky behavior in undergraduate college students at Winthrop University. The results are not yet available and they will become available at a later date.

Comments

Presented at the Southern Regional Honors Council Conference, March 2015

Honors Thesis

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Apr 24th, 1:20 PM Apr 24th, 2:50 PM

Romantic Relationship Satisfaction and Non-violent Risky Behavior of College Students

Richardson Ballroom

The years we spend in college offer college students a way to experience new things, gain individuality, and develop romantic relationships; however, this time is also known for the surfacing of non-violent risky behaviors among college students. Involvement in a romantic relationship and satisfaction with that relationship might relate to subjective well-being, perceptions of stress, and the practice of non-violent risky behaviors. We expect that individuals who are involved in satisfying romantic relationships will experience greater well-being and less subjective stress compared to those in non-satisfying relationships or single persons. This may result in less involvement in risky behaviors such as alcohol and drug use for those in satisfying, committed relationships. We will examine other types of risky behavior as well, including consensual sex. We expect greater involvement in consensual sex for persons in committed relationships. We also expect a positive association between relationship satisfaction and consensual sex. We will assess well-being, perceptions of stress, and involvement in risky behavior in undergraduate college students at Winthrop University. The results are not yet available and they will become available at a later date.