Event Title

A Cross-Racial Study of Attitudes Toward and Beliefs about Male Homosexuality

Poster Number

17

Faculty Mentor

Bradley Tripp, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Sociology and Anthropology

Location

Richardson Ballroom

Start Date

24-4-2015 1:20 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 2:50 PM

Description

This study presents data about the attitudes toward homosexuality of black and white people. The survey used in this study was adapted from Furnham and Saito (2009), which compared the attitudes and beliefs about male homosexuality of British and Japanese participants. The sample consisted of 131 (37 black, 97 white) Winthrop students. The results were analyzed using T-tests. The results of the study were consistent with the literature in inconsistency. Of the 17 categories tested, significant racial differences were found in 6. There were no significant racial differences in beliefs about attributing homosexuality to biological causes, the role of gender roles in causing homosexuality, or the belief that abnormality caused homosexuality. A relatively high percentage of all participants believed that factors such as father-son relationships could cause homosexuality, whereas abnormality was the least favored of all the factors. There were significant racial differences in the following factors: black participants were significantly more likely to believe that contact with homosexuals contributed to homosexuality; black participants were significantly more likely than whites to

Comments

Alexandera Foster is a McNair Scholar.

Presented at the South Carolina TRiO McNair Symposium, June 2014; the SAEOPP McNair/SSS Scholars Research Conference, June 2014; and the National Association of African American Studies Annual Conference, February 2015

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 24th, 1:20 PM Apr 24th, 2:50 PM

A Cross-Racial Study of Attitudes Toward and Beliefs about Male Homosexuality

Richardson Ballroom

This study presents data about the attitudes toward homosexuality of black and white people. The survey used in this study was adapted from Furnham and Saito (2009), which compared the attitudes and beliefs about male homosexuality of British and Japanese participants. The sample consisted of 131 (37 black, 97 white) Winthrop students. The results were analyzed using T-tests. The results of the study were consistent with the literature in inconsistency. Of the 17 categories tested, significant racial differences were found in 6. There were no significant racial differences in beliefs about attributing homosexuality to biological causes, the role of gender roles in causing homosexuality, or the belief that abnormality caused homosexuality. A relatively high percentage of all participants believed that factors such as father-son relationships could cause homosexuality, whereas abnormality was the least favored of all the factors. There were significant racial differences in the following factors: black participants were significantly more likely to believe that contact with homosexuals contributed to homosexuality; black participants were significantly more likely than whites to