Event Title

Influence of Facebook Secret Group Participation on Psychological Well-Being

Poster Number

19

Presenter Information

Leigh Fransen, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor

Merry Sleigh, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Location

Richardson Ballroom

Start Date

24-4-2015 1:20 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 2:50 PM

Description

We examined the effect of Facebook Secret Groups (FSG) use on psychological well-being. Adults (n=104) responded to the Flourishing Scale (Diener et al., 2009), the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS; Kobau et al., 2010), the Facebook Intensity Scale (FBI; Ellison, Steinfield, & Lampe, 2007), a social connectedness scale (OSC; Grieve et al., 2013), a social comparison on Facebook scale (Lee, 2009), and the Reinecke and Trepte (2013) authenticity measure (RAM). We divided participants into three groups: no FSG, light FSG, and heavy FSG usage. Participants in the heavy FSG condition had higher OSC scores than in the No FSG condition; however, FSG participation did not relate to any authenticity measures. Participants who did not use FSG had lower FBI scores than the other two conditions. The higher the FBI scores, the higher the negative social comparison score and the higher the OSC score. Participants with higher OSC scores also reported that they wanted people to see them as they truly are and that their friends were authentic on Facebook. The higher the RAM score, the lower the depression and the higher the Flourishing score. In sum, adults who heavily engaged in FSG reported being more socially connected to their friends on Facebook. However, this finding did not connect directly to online authenticity. Perhaps adults who are more socially connected to their Facebook friends are the ones more driven to join FSG. This study supports the assertion of previous researchers that social media use can either be alienating or encourage connectedness.

Comments

Presented at the Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Annual Meeting, March 2015

Winner, Psi Chi Regional Research Award, SEPA, March 2015

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Apr 24th, 1:20 PM Apr 24th, 2:50 PM

Influence of Facebook Secret Group Participation on Psychological Well-Being

Richardson Ballroom

We examined the effect of Facebook Secret Groups (FSG) use on psychological well-being. Adults (n=104) responded to the Flourishing Scale (Diener et al., 2009), the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS; Kobau et al., 2010), the Facebook Intensity Scale (FBI; Ellison, Steinfield, & Lampe, 2007), a social connectedness scale (OSC; Grieve et al., 2013), a social comparison on Facebook scale (Lee, 2009), and the Reinecke and Trepte (2013) authenticity measure (RAM). We divided participants into three groups: no FSG, light FSG, and heavy FSG usage. Participants in the heavy FSG condition had higher OSC scores than in the No FSG condition; however, FSG participation did not relate to any authenticity measures. Participants who did not use FSG had lower FBI scores than the other two conditions. The higher the FBI scores, the higher the negative social comparison score and the higher the OSC score. Participants with higher OSC scores also reported that they wanted people to see them as they truly are and that their friends were authentic on Facebook. The higher the RAM score, the lower the depression and the higher the Flourishing score. In sum, adults who heavily engaged in FSG reported being more socially connected to their friends on Facebook. However, this finding did not connect directly to online authenticity. Perhaps adults who are more socially connected to their Facebook friends are the ones more driven to join FSG. This study supports the assertion of previous researchers that social media use can either be alienating or encourage connectedness.