Event Title

How to Interpret a Scream: On Dance Collaboration

Presenter Information

Alexandria Nunweiler

Faculty Mentor

Emily Morgan, M.F.A.; Stacy McConnell, M.F.A.; and Amy Gerald, Ph.D.

College

College of Visual and Performing Arts

Department

CVPA – Department of Theatre and Dance and CAS – Department of English

Location

Barnes Recital Hall, Conservatory of Music

Start Date

24-4-2015 3:45 PM

Description

Of all the existing art forms, one of the least written about is dance. For the dancer and non-dancer, writing about movement can prove to be difficult; at least for me, it did. Over the course of the Fall 2014 semester, I tracked my choreographic process from the first development of movement to the concert in a blog I have titled “How to Interpret a Scream.” This research piece pulls together art history, dance, and writing components as a cross-disciplinary project as well as it shows the collaborative creative process of dance making. As a choreographer, this dance was especially challenging because it involved research on the life of Edvard Munch and his painting “Scream,” on which the dance is based. In conjunction with the information, the piece requires two live dancers to collaborate with me to show the process in front of the audience. As the work is shared, the dancers and I create an entirely new phrase to interpret a scream.

Comments

Presented at the Winthrop University CVPA Undergraduate Research Symposium, March 2014

CVPA – Department of Theatre and Dance and CAS – Department of English

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Apr 24th, 3:45 PM

How to Interpret a Scream: On Dance Collaboration

Barnes Recital Hall, Conservatory of Music

Of all the existing art forms, one of the least written about is dance. For the dancer and non-dancer, writing about movement can prove to be difficult; at least for me, it did. Over the course of the Fall 2014 semester, I tracked my choreographic process from the first development of movement to the concert in a blog I have titled “How to Interpret a Scream.” This research piece pulls together art history, dance, and writing components as a cross-disciplinary project as well as it shows the collaborative creative process of dance making. As a choreographer, this dance was especially challenging because it involved research on the life of Edvard Munch and his painting “Scream,” on which the dance is based. In conjunction with the information, the piece requires two live dancers to collaborate with me to show the process in front of the audience. As the work is shared, the dancers and I create an entirely new phrase to interpret a scream.