Event Title

Examination of Factors Surrounding Solar Power-Friendliness in U.S. State Policies

Presenter Information

Peter Nagovnak, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor

Stephen Smith, Ph.D. and Timothy Boylan, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Political Science

Location

DiGiorgio Campus Center, Room 221

Start Date

24-4-2015 4:35 PM

Description

This study aims to investigate the political, social, economic and geographical correlates of solar-power friendly policies in the U.S. states and the District of Columbia. Given the role of the states in shaping current energy policy, this topic has received relatively little scholarly attention. This lack of attention is particularly unfortunate given the potential importance of solar energy in the nation’s future energy mix. Theoretical considerations and the existing research suggest that the extent to which a state is solar-friendly will be associated with the following variables: the per capita number of residents employed in the fossil fuel economy, the per capita amount of residents employed in the solar industry, the per capita amount of companies in the fossil fuel industry, the per capita amount of companies in the solar industry, the ruling party in a state’s legislature, the relative amount of contributions to political campaigns made by the fossil fuel and the solar industry, the amount of sunshine available, the average family income, education levels, and current electricity prices. This research investigates the extent to which these associations exist. The results of this study will increase scholarly understanding of an important yet under-researched issue, as well as hopefully increase the ability of policymakers, advocacy groups, and the public to assess the feasibility of future planned or demanded policies.

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Apr 24th, 4:35 PM

Examination of Factors Surrounding Solar Power-Friendliness in U.S. State Policies

DiGiorgio Campus Center, Room 221

This study aims to investigate the political, social, economic and geographical correlates of solar-power friendly policies in the U.S. states and the District of Columbia. Given the role of the states in shaping current energy policy, this topic has received relatively little scholarly attention. This lack of attention is particularly unfortunate given the potential importance of solar energy in the nation’s future energy mix. Theoretical considerations and the existing research suggest that the extent to which a state is solar-friendly will be associated with the following variables: the per capita number of residents employed in the fossil fuel economy, the per capita amount of residents employed in the solar industry, the per capita amount of companies in the fossil fuel industry, the per capita amount of companies in the solar industry, the ruling party in a state’s legislature, the relative amount of contributions to political campaigns made by the fossil fuel and the solar industry, the amount of sunshine available, the average family income, education levels, and current electricity prices. This research investigates the extent to which these associations exist. The results of this study will increase scholarly understanding of an important yet under-researched issue, as well as hopefully increase the ability of policymakers, advocacy groups, and the public to assess the feasibility of future planned or demanded policies.