Event Title

"His Owne Scriveyn”: Adam Pinkhurst and the Consequences of "Chaucer's Scribe"

Presenter Information

Brierly Harris

Faculty Mentor

Josephine Koster, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

English

Location

DiGiorgio Campus Center, Room 220

Start Date

24-4-2015 3:35 PM

Description

In 2004, Linne Mooney announced that she has discovered the identity of Chaucer’s primary scribe, Adam Pinkhurst, formerly known as Scribe B, as well as linking his handwriting to the Hengwrt and Ellesmere manuscripts of The Canterbury Tales. Her 2006 article, “Chaucer’s Scribe,” has facilitated a critical conversation over the last eight years that represents a 21st century perspective into medieval studies. Interest in Adam and Chaucer’s professional relationship can be attributed to one of Chaucer’s shorter poems, “Chaucer’s Words to Adam, His Own Scribe,” which Mooney argues can only represent Adam Pinkhurst. My research focuses on the rapid changes within Chaucer studies since Adam’s identification, particularly in light of any disproportionate readings of Chaucer’s short poem. Adam was Chaucer’s scribe, not his editor or his muse, but his influence on Chaucer can be tricky to define without records of friendship beyond employment. My assessment of previous scholarship attempts to deflate any exaggerated characterization of Adam Pinkhurst, as well as contributing my own opinion on the significance of this particular scribe to Chaucer’s creative process.

Comments

Presented at the Big South Undergraduate Research Symposium (BigSURS), April 2015

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Apr 24th, 3:35 PM

"His Owne Scriveyn”: Adam Pinkhurst and the Consequences of "Chaucer's Scribe"

DiGiorgio Campus Center, Room 220

In 2004, Linne Mooney announced that she has discovered the identity of Chaucer’s primary scribe, Adam Pinkhurst, formerly known as Scribe B, as well as linking his handwriting to the Hengwrt and Ellesmere manuscripts of The Canterbury Tales. Her 2006 article, “Chaucer’s Scribe,” has facilitated a critical conversation over the last eight years that represents a 21st century perspective into medieval studies. Interest in Adam and Chaucer’s professional relationship can be attributed to one of Chaucer’s shorter poems, “Chaucer’s Words to Adam, His Own Scribe,” which Mooney argues can only represent Adam Pinkhurst. My research focuses on the rapid changes within Chaucer studies since Adam’s identification, particularly in light of any disproportionate readings of Chaucer’s short poem. Adam was Chaucer’s scribe, not his editor or his muse, but his influence on Chaucer can be tricky to define without records of friendship beyond employment. My assessment of previous scholarship attempts to deflate any exaggerated characterization of Adam Pinkhurst, as well as contributing my own opinion on the significance of this particular scribe to Chaucer’s creative process.