Paper Title

Women of Color: Using Intersectionality Theory to Explore Cumulative Disadvantages in Health Outcomes

Location

Room 214, West Center

Start Date

1-4-2016 3:30 PM

End Date

1-4-2016 4:45 PM

Keywords

Women of color, Intersectionality, health disparity

Abstract

Health disparities between women of color and their White counterparts remain pervasive throughout the U.S, including the South. For instance, Black and Hispanic women are nearly two times more likely than White women to have Alzheimer's disease and related dementia (ADRD). The disparity is also evident in diabetes where Black women are diagnosed with the disease at rate of 9.0 per 100 compared to a rate of 5.4 for White women. They are also more than two times more likely than White women to die from the disease. HIV/AIDS is another area of health that reflects great disparity. Women of color account for the vast majority (78%) of women living with the disease. They are also more likely than Whites to die from the disease.

These disparities have tremendous implications for minority families. The high rate of female-headed households among minorities means that poor health among women creates grave financial burden which can unravel the stability of many families. This heightens the need to examine the factors that influence their health.

Intersectionality offers a compelling framework to understand the multiple layers of oppression that contribute to poor health. This presentation will highlight the interaction of race, gender, class, and location in shaping health outcomes for women of color in the South.

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Apr 1st, 3:30 PM Apr 1st, 4:45 PM

Women of Color: Using Intersectionality Theory to Explore Cumulative Disadvantages in Health Outcomes

Room 214, West Center

Health disparities between women of color and their White counterparts remain pervasive throughout the U.S, including the South. For instance, Black and Hispanic women are nearly two times more likely than White women to have Alzheimer's disease and related dementia (ADRD). The disparity is also evident in diabetes where Black women are diagnosed with the disease at rate of 9.0 per 100 compared to a rate of 5.4 for White women. They are also more than two times more likely than White women to die from the disease. HIV/AIDS is another area of health that reflects great disparity. Women of color account for the vast majority (78%) of women living with the disease. They are also more likely than Whites to die from the disease.

These disparities have tremendous implications for minority families. The high rate of female-headed households among minorities means that poor health among women creates grave financial burden which can unravel the stability of many families. This heightens the need to examine the factors that influence their health.

Intersectionality offers a compelling framework to understand the multiple layers of oppression that contribute to poor health. This presentation will highlight the interaction of race, gender, class, and location in shaping health outcomes for women of color in the South.