Paper Title

The Oeuvre of Reva Spiro Luxenberg

Panel

Literary Interventions I

Location

Room 220, DiGiorgio Campus Center (DiGs)

Start Date

31-3-2016 3:30 PM

End Date

31-3-2016 4:45 PM

Keywords

Edward R. Levenson, Reva Spiro Luxenberg, Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn, New York, Jewish Women, Orthodox Jewish Women, The Jewish Women's Studies, Guide, off-white, Jews' color diversity

Abstract

Reva Spiro Luxenberg in her novels describes Jewish women protagonists who overcome their own struggles and fight for others as well. Chaya Bloom, for example, in Grand Army Plaza, a far from privileged woman, adopts Jamal Holden, an eleven-year-old African American orphan left to her by his dying mother in their Brooklyn apartment building. Sadie Weinstein, in The Cereal [sic] Killer, is a gutsy and successful amateur sleuth. Ms. Luxenberg's work is evidence of the intersectional identity and concerns of Jewish women, described by such scholars as Evelyn Torton Beck, Marla Brettschneider, and Jessica Greenebaum.

Comments

Edward R. Levenson is a founding member of the National Women's Studies Association, having attended its first conference in Lawrence, Kansas in 1979. He co-edited, with Rabbi Sue Levi Elwell, the first edition of The Jewish Women's Studies Guide (Biblio Press, 1982).

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Mar 31st, 3:30 PM Mar 31st, 4:45 PM

The Oeuvre of Reva Spiro Luxenberg

Room 220, DiGiorgio Campus Center (DiGs)

Reva Spiro Luxenberg in her novels describes Jewish women protagonists who overcome their own struggles and fight for others as well. Chaya Bloom, for example, in Grand Army Plaza, a far from privileged woman, adopts Jamal Holden, an eleven-year-old African American orphan left to her by his dying mother in their Brooklyn apartment building. Sadie Weinstein, in The Cereal [sic] Killer, is a gutsy and successful amateur sleuth. Ms. Luxenberg's work is evidence of the intersectional identity and concerns of Jewish women, described by such scholars as Evelyn Torton Beck, Marla Brettschneider, and Jessica Greenebaum.