Paper Title

One Day at a Time: The Intersectionality of Alcoholism and Feminism

Location

Room 222, DiGiorgio Campus Center (DiGs)

Start Date

April 2016

End Date

April 2016

Keywords

Feminism, theory, addiction, stigma, victimization, alcoholism, abuse, awareness, intersectionality, language

Abstract

Alcohol is prevalent throughout American culture. It’s for sale alongside our groceries or at the corner ABC store right next to McDonald’s. The National Institute of Health reported in 2013 that over 86% of the US population had drank alcohol at least once in their lives. In all likelihood, it is consumed on an occasional or regular basis by the majority of this population. The prevalence of alcohol has masked an alarming statistic - over 16.6 million Americans suffer from an alcohol use disorder or alcoholism. Only 7% of this group will ever seek and receive treatment or assistance for this illness. It is suggested that this percentage could be greatly improved by changing the stereotypes and stigma surrounding the notion of alcoholism and what it means to be an “alcoholic”. Alcoholism and feminism share an intersectionality which includes the power of language (denotation, connotation, stigma), challenges of victim blaming, and objectification. In the proposed paper, these topics will be further explored through the lens of feminist theory. The goal of this work is to create a union between feminism and alcoholism so that the lives of alcoholics may be bettered by the guidance of a feminist approach. This may include suggestions for format and methodology of treatment programs/options, encouraging an open dialogue that lifts the shadow of alcoholism, and a call to action, friendship, and awareness of those struggling with alcoholism.

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Apr 2nd, 3:30 PM Apr 2nd, 4:45 PM

One Day at a Time: The Intersectionality of Alcoholism and Feminism

Room 222, DiGiorgio Campus Center (DiGs)

Alcohol is prevalent throughout American culture. It’s for sale alongside our groceries or at the corner ABC store right next to McDonald’s. The National Institute of Health reported in 2013 that over 86% of the US population had drank alcohol at least once in their lives. In all likelihood, it is consumed on an occasional or regular basis by the majority of this population. The prevalence of alcohol has masked an alarming statistic - over 16.6 million Americans suffer from an alcohol use disorder or alcoholism. Only 7% of this group will ever seek and receive treatment or assistance for this illness. It is suggested that this percentage could be greatly improved by changing the stereotypes and stigma surrounding the notion of alcoholism and what it means to be an “alcoholic”. Alcoholism and feminism share an intersectionality which includes the power of language (denotation, connotation, stigma), challenges of victim blaming, and objectification. In the proposed paper, these topics will be further explored through the lens of feminist theory. The goal of this work is to create a union between feminism and alcoholism so that the lives of alcoholics may be bettered by the guidance of a feminist approach. This may include suggestions for format and methodology of treatment programs/options, encouraging an open dialogue that lifts the shadow of alcoholism, and a call to action, friendship, and awareness of those struggling with alcoholism.