Location

Room 220, DiGiorgio Campus Center (DiGs)

Start Date

April 2016

End Date

April 2016

Keywords

Acting, Film, Transgender, Race

Abstract

The question of gender inequality in film has been widely debated, both within the industry as well as within gender studies, with scholars such as Dr. Stacy L. Smith, Marc Choueiti, Elizabeth Scofeils, Dr. Katherine Pieper and Melissa Rigney arguing about gender inequality in modern popular films. However, these critics ignore the issue of trans-inclusive representation. My paper addresses the issue of trans* representation in modern film through comparative analysis with Greek theatre and early American film. I argue that in order to better understand lack of non-cis-gendered representation, it is instructive to connect this phenomenon to blackface in early American film as well as males playing female roles in Greek theatre. I argue that there is a growing inequality present in modern day film specifically in relation to casting of non-cis-gendered people in non-cis-gendered roles. My paper connects the phenomenon of the lack of trans* folk in the film industry, early American blackface, and Greek acting; asking why we haven’t learned, and finding out what we can do.

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Apr 2nd, 3:30 PM Apr 2nd, 4:45 PM

Transgender Issues in Film

Room 220, DiGiorgio Campus Center (DiGs)

The question of gender inequality in film has been widely debated, both within the industry as well as within gender studies, with scholars such as Dr. Stacy L. Smith, Marc Choueiti, Elizabeth Scofeils, Dr. Katherine Pieper and Melissa Rigney arguing about gender inequality in modern popular films. However, these critics ignore the issue of trans-inclusive representation. My paper addresses the issue of trans* representation in modern film through comparative analysis with Greek theatre and early American film. I argue that in order to better understand lack of non-cis-gendered representation, it is instructive to connect this phenomenon to blackface in early American film as well as males playing female roles in Greek theatre. I argue that there is a growing inequality present in modern day film specifically in relation to casting of non-cis-gendered people in non-cis-gendered roles. My paper connects the phenomenon of the lack of trans* folk in the film industry, early American blackface, and Greek acting; asking why we haven’t learned, and finding out what we can do.