Paper Title

Two Sides to Every Story: Imposed versus Asserted Leadership Identities

Panel

Culture and Identity in Psychology

Location

Room 222, DiGiorgio Campus Center (DiGs)

Start Date

2-4-2016 2:00 PM

End Date

2-4-2016 3:15 PM

Keywords

Identity, Psychology, Science, WGS, LGBTQ, Intersectionality

Abstract

In the realm of leadership, much attention has been given to counting, describing, and operationalizing the various types of leadership that exist (Parker & Welch, 2013). Research on leadership often seeks to uncover the differential effects of leadership style on a variety of outcome variables (Robinson, Lloyd, & Rowe, 2008). This presentation will illuminate an additional, less-considered area of leadership research, chiefly by presenting the idea that leadership exists at the intersection of one's asserted leadership identity (the identity which they actively perform) and one's imposed leadership identity (the identity which other people perceive).

Comments

Hilary Rampey is a fourth-year graduate student in the Applied Social and Community Psychology program at NC State. Her research interests include feminism, leadership, sense of community, and community responsibility, with particular emphasis on how the strength of community ties may help or hinder one's self-perceived leadership potential and community involvement.

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Apr 2nd, 2:00 PM Apr 2nd, 3:15 PM

Two Sides to Every Story: Imposed versus Asserted Leadership Identities

Room 222, DiGiorgio Campus Center (DiGs)

In the realm of leadership, much attention has been given to counting, describing, and operationalizing the various types of leadership that exist (Parker & Welch, 2013). Research on leadership often seeks to uncover the differential effects of leadership style on a variety of outcome variables (Robinson, Lloyd, & Rowe, 2008). This presentation will illuminate an additional, less-considered area of leadership research, chiefly by presenting the idea that leadership exists at the intersection of one's asserted leadership identity (the identity which they actively perform) and one's imposed leadership identity (the identity which other people perceive).