Paper Title

“I’m not a sexual minority...I’m me”: Intersectionality as a Framework for Studying Health and Well-being among Ethnically-Diverse LGBTQ+ Persons

Panel

Culture and Identity in Psychology

Location

Room 222, DiGiorgio Campus Center (DiGs)

Start Date

4-2016 2:00 PM

End Date

2-4-2016 3:15 PM

Keywords

Identity, Psychology, Science, WGS, LGBTQ, Intersectionality

Abstract

Intersectionality emphasizes examining the ways in which structural forces and social locations combine to impact people’s experiences, moving beyond blanket labels like “sexual minority” which fail to acknowledge that two or more categories might intersect and “cut across [these] diverse realisms of experiences” (Bowleg, 2012). This presentation will highlight challenges and strengths of utilizing an intersectionality framework when studying health and well-being among queer Latina women and LGBT immigrant populations—populations for whom issues of privilege and multi-level discrimination are particularly salient.

Comments

Mary Guerrant is a fourth-year graduate student and PhD candidate in the Applied Social and Community Psychology program at NC State. Inspired by her international experiences in countries such as India and Haiti, Mary’s work employs community-based participatory research approaches to promote health equity among ethnic minority LGBTQ individuals. Her master's thesis examined acculturation and psychological well-being among LGBTQ immigrants, and her current research is focused on examining healthcare behaviors and empowering queer Latina women to be advocates for their own health.

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Apr 1st, 2:00 PM Apr 2nd, 3:15 PM

“I’m not a sexual minority...I’m me”: Intersectionality as a Framework for Studying Health and Well-being among Ethnically-Diverse LGBTQ+ Persons

Room 222, DiGiorgio Campus Center (DiGs)

Intersectionality emphasizes examining the ways in which structural forces and social locations combine to impact people’s experiences, moving beyond blanket labels like “sexual minority” which fail to acknowledge that two or more categories might intersect and “cut across [these] diverse realisms of experiences” (Bowleg, 2012). This presentation will highlight challenges and strengths of utilizing an intersectionality framework when studying health and well-being among queer Latina women and LGBT immigrant populations—populations for whom issues of privilege and multi-level discrimination are particularly salient.