Panel

Identity and Fluidity in Gender and Sexuality

Location

Room 214, West Center

Start Date

2-4-2016 2:00 PM

End Date

2-4-2016 3:15 PM

Keywords

Gender, Construction, Socialization, Male Gaze, Gender Performance

Abstract

In the historical and social landscape that currently exists in America, the concept of gender, and especially the concept of women, has been created and enforced through societal expectations. From essentialism in the past, social and psychological theory has evolved to consider the social impact on gender construction. Foucault’s prison theory, Berger’s theory of surveying, and Mulvey’s theory of the Male Gaze can be used to show that gender, though it used to be viewed as inherent to a person’s identity, is actually a process of social conditioning. Women are shaped by society but continue to follow their roles because social pressure, as it applies to gender, is perpetual and eventually is imposed by women on themselves. Distinctions in the way that men and women speak and utilize language, ways that women are treated in the media and advertising as nurturing and submissive or as sexual objects, and the way that young girls are marketed sexualized products from a young age prove that men and women are different. However, this difference is a direct result of being socialized into occupying separate roles, a phenomenon that has created a restrictive and limited interpretation of gender.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 2:00 PM Apr 2nd, 3:15 PM

Gender as a Socially Constructed Phenomenon

Room 214, West Center

In the historical and social landscape that currently exists in America, the concept of gender, and especially the concept of women, has been created and enforced through societal expectations. From essentialism in the past, social and psychological theory has evolved to consider the social impact on gender construction. Foucault’s prison theory, Berger’s theory of surveying, and Mulvey’s theory of the Male Gaze can be used to show that gender, though it used to be viewed as inherent to a person’s identity, is actually a process of social conditioning. Women are shaped by society but continue to follow their roles because social pressure, as it applies to gender, is perpetual and eventually is imposed by women on themselves. Distinctions in the way that men and women speak and utilize language, ways that women are treated in the media and advertising as nurturing and submissive or as sexual objects, and the way that young girls are marketed sexualized products from a young age prove that men and women are different. However, this difference is a direct result of being socialized into occupying separate roles, a phenomenon that has created a restrictive and limited interpretation of gender.