Paper Title

Queering the American Dream

Location

Room 220, DiGiorgio Campus Center (DiGs)

Start Date

April 2016

End Date

April 2016

Keywords

Queer theory, American Dream, destabilizing, heteronormativity, liberation, gender binary

Abstract

The American Dream is a motif that exerts normative influences and evinces limitations arising from its static, binary nature. The potential of the American Dream is better understood and more widely accessible when examined through a queer lens. This paper provides an historical review and analysis of the American Dream and proposes to extend queer theory beyond the academy. Queer is a concept that is broadly understood as simply an opposition to the norm. Just as feminists sought to disengage concepts of equality from a phallocentric model, the inherent instability of the word queer proves useful for reinterpreting gender, identify politics, linguistic constraints of normative language, and other sociologic forces. Queering the motif of the American Dream offers the promise of destabilizing the heteronormative reality, fostering a more inclusive Dream, and ultimately liberating the Dream from the confines of a binary and static domain. Queer is mutable and fluid and those disenfranchised from the American Dream may find that when the American Dream is liberated so too are all the Dreamers.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 9:00 AM Apr 2nd, 10:15 AM

Queering the American Dream

Room 220, DiGiorgio Campus Center (DiGs)

The American Dream is a motif that exerts normative influences and evinces limitations arising from its static, binary nature. The potential of the American Dream is better understood and more widely accessible when examined through a queer lens. This paper provides an historical review and analysis of the American Dream and proposes to extend queer theory beyond the academy. Queer is a concept that is broadly understood as simply an opposition to the norm. Just as feminists sought to disengage concepts of equality from a phallocentric model, the inherent instability of the word queer proves useful for reinterpreting gender, identify politics, linguistic constraints of normative language, and other sociologic forces. Queering the motif of the American Dream offers the promise of destabilizing the heteronormative reality, fostering a more inclusive Dream, and ultimately liberating the Dream from the confines of a binary and static domain. Queer is mutable and fluid and those disenfranchised from the American Dream may find that when the American Dream is liberated so too are all the Dreamers.